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  • 03 Feb 2013
    Shocking moment Black teenager punches woman after she calls him a 'smelly Nigerian'..
    6392 Posted by webby
  • By webby
    Shocking moment Black teenager punches woman after she calls him a 'smelly Nigerian'..
    Feb 03, 2013 6392
  • 30 Jan 2013
    China’s growing presence in Africa is one of the region’s biggest stories, but even seasoned analysts cannot decide whether this booming relationship is good or bad for Africa.Critics say Chinese strategy is entirely self-promotional, aimed at maintaining access to Africa’s precious mineral resources even when that means propping up odious governments. China’s supporters say the Asian superpower is strictly neutral and business-oriented, preferring to generate economic growth not a dangerous dependency on aid.China has certainly been contributing to Africa’s economic growth, both in terms of trade and with building infrastructure. All over the continent, it has built roads, railways, ports, airports, and more, filling a critical gap that western donors have been shy to provide and unblocking major bottlenecks to growth.The rehabilitated 840-mile Benguela railway line, for example, now connects Angola’s Atlantic coast with the Democratic Republic of Congo and Zambia. And Chinese-financed roads have cut journey times from Ethiopia’s hinterland to the strategic port of Djibouti, facilitating livestock exports.Meanwhile, bilateral trade between Africa and China continues to grow at an extraordinary pace, reaching $160 billion in 2011 from just $ 9 billion in 2000.But some 90 percent of Sino-African trade is still based around natural resources – oil, ores, and minerals. And exports of natural resources by themselves do not help Africa to develop as we can see from the examples of Nigeria and Angola, Sub-Saharan Africa’s two largest oil exporters.First, oil and mining are not labor intensive industries. So while natural resources may create impressive headline growth figures, they do not necessarily translate into widespread job creation.Second, as we saw in the Netherlands in the 1960s and Norway today, large oil and mineral reserves can distort the local currency, pushing up prices of other exports, such as agricultural products, and making them much harder to sell overseas.Third, without careful management, oil and mineral revenues have often fuelled corruption which has a severely negative impact on a country’s development. It’s notable, for example, that China is not yet one of the supporting countries for the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI), an initiative to promote transparency and accountability in the governance of natural resources.Away from the oil and mining industries, critics of China say they don’t see much evidence of China advocating for Africa on global issues either.Climate change and better access to overseas markets are two such issues. But at the Africa Progress Panel we see little evidence of China pushing hard for improved market access for African products in non-African markets. Indeed, South African and other manufacturers have frequently complained about the crushing competition from Chinese textiles. Nor do we see China pushing for any meaningful breakthroughs in climate negotiations that would favor African nations.More heavily publicized, Chinese use of its veto in the U.N. Security Council to inhibit international action on Darfur has made a mockery of China’s supposedly “neutral” stance.So what else could Africa and China do so that Africa benefits more from its growing relationship with China?For a start, African countries could diversify their economies as much as possible away from supplying unprocessed natural resources to China. This will make them less dependent on the vagaries of both the Chinese economy and the ups and downs of global commodity prices. Trade with China may have helped insulate Africa from the full impact of the 2008 financial crisis, but Africa still looks vulnerable to China’s economic slowdown. Meanwhile, African nations should also prepare for the day when they no longer have natural resources to sell. At the Africa Progress Panel, we talk about transforming natural resource wealth into human capital, by investing revenues into health and education.Second, African countries need to encourage Chinese investment into more labor intensive sectors. Africa’s population is growing faster than anywhere else in the world, and job creation is a top priority. If Africa cannot create jobs to keep up with the growth of its workforce, then we can expect to see a large and growing population of frustrated, jobless youth.As China’s relationship with Africa shifts from being essentially government-to-government to business-to-business, some analysts see enormous potential in the manufacturing industry, especially for clothing and textiles. Rising Chinese wages in this sector may lead Chinese manufacturers to export jobs to African countries where labor prices are lower.One example of how this might work is Zambia, where some 300 Chinese companies now employ around 25,000 people. Ethiopia’s shoemaking sector has also benefitted from Chinese investment that has created jobs and exports.For the most part, however, and despite the scale of investment, linkages between Chinese investment and local economies remains weak.Third, African countries could negotiate better terms with Chinese investors, including quality control and better linkages with local economies. African governments could urge China to improve market access for African goods overseas, for example in trade fora such as the World Trade Organization. The IMF estimates the average import tariff faced by low-income countries in Africa in the BRICS at 13 percent – around three times the level in the United States and the European Union (which also operate a range of non-tariff barriers).On quality, observers describe shoddy workmanship in a range of Chinese investments from crumbling walls in a Chinese-built hospital in Angola, enormous potholes in Ghanaian and Zambian roads, and a leaking roof in the African Union’s new $ 200 million headquarters opened in January.Fairly or unfairly, many in Africa complain that Chinese projects do not employ enough Africans or do enough to transfer skills and technology. The reality is that this will vary from project to project. When a country is emerging from a decade or two of civil war, its labor force may not have sufficient capacity to work on technical projects. But at the Africa Progress Panel we view job creation as a priority issue for Africa’s development. Skills development has a major role to play in this respect.And when Africans are employed, working conditions are sometimes substandard. Human Rights Watch reports dangerous work conditions in Zambian mines. And pay disputes at a copper mine also in Zambia led to two Chinese managers shooting at miners in 2010, then the death of a Chinese manager this August.Fifth, Africa could keep working to make itself as attractive a business environment as possible. At the Africa Progress Panel, we consider further regional economic integration to be a priority. Africa’s population will one day represent the world’s largest consumer market. If they can get increased market access by investing in a single country, Chinese businesses will want to invest much more.Analysts see more Chinese businesses coming to Africa, meaning that the Africa-China relationship is diversifying away from simply government-to-government relationships. This makes it harder to characterize the relationship as either good or bad. However we view it, China’s growing presence in Africa is part of a rapidly changing reality that presents enormous opportunity.
    216753 Posted by Luguterrah Millie
  • China’s growing presence in Africa is one of the region’s biggest stories, but even seasoned analysts cannot decide whether this booming relationship is good or bad for Africa.Critics say Chinese strategy is entirely self-promotional, aimed at maintaining access to Africa’s precious mineral resources even when that means propping up odious governments. China’s supporters say the Asian superpower is strictly neutral and business-oriented, preferring to generate economic growth not a dangerous dependency on aid.China has certainly been contributing to Africa’s economic growth, both in terms of trade and with building infrastructure. All over the continent, it has built roads, railways, ports, airports, and more, filling a critical gap that western donors have been shy to provide and unblocking major bottlenecks to growth.The rehabilitated 840-mile Benguela railway line, for example, now connects Angola’s Atlantic coast with the Democratic Republic of Congo and Zambia. And Chinese-financed roads have cut journey times from Ethiopia’s hinterland to the strategic port of Djibouti, facilitating livestock exports.Meanwhile, bilateral trade between Africa and China continues to grow at an extraordinary pace, reaching $160 billion in 2011 from just $ 9 billion in 2000.But some 90 percent of Sino-African trade is still based around natural resources – oil, ores, and minerals. And exports of natural resources by themselves do not help Africa to develop as we can see from the examples of Nigeria and Angola, Sub-Saharan Africa’s two largest oil exporters.First, oil and mining are not labor intensive industries. So while natural resources may create impressive headline growth figures, they do not necessarily translate into widespread job creation.Second, as we saw in the Netherlands in the 1960s and Norway today, large oil and mineral reserves can distort the local currency, pushing up prices of other exports, such as agricultural products, and making them much harder to sell overseas.Third, without careful management, oil and mineral revenues have often fuelled corruption which has a severely negative impact on a country’s development. It’s notable, for example, that China is not yet one of the supporting countries for the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI), an initiative to promote transparency and accountability in the governance of natural resources.Away from the oil and mining industries, critics of China say they don’t see much evidence of China advocating for Africa on global issues either.Climate change and better access to overseas markets are two such issues. But at the Africa Progress Panel we see little evidence of China pushing hard for improved market access for African products in non-African markets. Indeed, South African and other manufacturers have frequently complained about the crushing competition from Chinese textiles. Nor do we see China pushing for any meaningful breakthroughs in climate negotiations that would favor African nations.More heavily publicized, Chinese use of its veto in the U.N. Security Council to inhibit international action on Darfur has made a mockery of China’s supposedly “neutral” stance.So what else could Africa and China do so that Africa benefits more from its growing relationship with China?For a start, African countries could diversify their economies as much as possible away from supplying unprocessed natural resources to China. This will make them less dependent on the vagaries of both the Chinese economy and the ups and downs of global commodity prices. Trade with China may have helped insulate Africa from the full impact of the 2008 financial crisis, but Africa still looks vulnerable to China’s economic slowdown. Meanwhile, African nations should also prepare for the day when they no longer have natural resources to sell. At the Africa Progress Panel, we talk about transforming natural resource wealth into human capital, by investing revenues into health and education.Second, African countries need to encourage Chinese investment into more labor intensive sectors. Africa’s population is growing faster than anywhere else in the world, and job creation is a top priority. If Africa cannot create jobs to keep up with the growth of its workforce, then we can expect to see a large and growing population of frustrated, jobless youth.As China’s relationship with Africa shifts from being essentially government-to-government to business-to-business, some analysts see enormous potential in the manufacturing industry, especially for clothing and textiles. Rising Chinese wages in this sector may lead Chinese manufacturers to export jobs to African countries where labor prices are lower.One example of how this might work is Zambia, where some 300 Chinese companies now employ around 25,000 people. Ethiopia’s shoemaking sector has also benefitted from Chinese investment that has created jobs and exports.For the most part, however, and despite the scale of investment, linkages between Chinese investment and local economies remains weak.Third, African countries could negotiate better terms with Chinese investors, including quality control and better linkages with local economies. African governments could urge China to improve market access for African goods overseas, for example in trade fora such as the World Trade Organization. The IMF estimates the average import tariff faced by low-income countries in Africa in the BRICS at 13 percent – around three times the level in the United States and the European Union (which also operate a range of non-tariff barriers).On quality, observers describe shoddy workmanship in a range of Chinese investments from crumbling walls in a Chinese-built hospital in Angola, enormous potholes in Ghanaian and Zambian roads, and a leaking roof in the African Union’s new $ 200 million headquarters opened in January.Fairly or unfairly, many in Africa complain that Chinese projects do not employ enough Africans or do enough to transfer skills and technology. The reality is that this will vary from project to project. When a country is emerging from a decade or two of civil war, its labor force may not have sufficient capacity to work on technical projects. But at the Africa Progress Panel we view job creation as a priority issue for Africa’s development. Skills development has a major role to play in this respect.And when Africans are employed, working conditions are sometimes substandard. Human Rights Watch reports dangerous work conditions in Zambian mines. And pay disputes at a copper mine also in Zambia led to two Chinese managers shooting at miners in 2010, then the death of a Chinese manager this August.Fifth, Africa could keep working to make itself as attractive a business environment as possible. At the Africa Progress Panel, we consider further regional economic integration to be a priority. Africa’s population will one day represent the world’s largest consumer market. If they can get increased market access by investing in a single country, Chinese businesses will want to invest much more.Analysts see more Chinese businesses coming to Africa, meaning that the Africa-China relationship is diversifying away from simply government-to-government relationships. This makes it harder to characterize the relationship as either good or bad. However we view it, China’s growing presence in Africa is part of a rapidly changing reality that presents enormous opportunity.
    Jan 30, 2013 216753
  • 30 Jan 2013
    It is very easy to find fault in what someone else did or his doing; however, we find it difficult to profess a workable solution facing the same constraints. For one reason or another, some people feel jaded and/or disillusioned because GEJ has not lived up to their expectations, regardless of whether their expectations were reasonable or not.In the interest of full disclosure, I’m one of those people but I constantly ask myself if I can do any better facing the same constraints – some of the constraints which probably fostered me into power. I won’t answer the question so as not to set the tone of this post by seeming to be anti or pro GEJ.However, the question for you is:If you wake up tomorrow and find yourself to be the President of Nigeria, what would you do about the following and how would you do it? The “how” is the most important part of this exercise.1. Boko Haram, MEND, OPC etc (any armed group)2. Police and their inadequacies3. Manufacturing including import/export4. Youth unemployment5. Taxes6. Crude Oil revenue7. Mineral resources (mines)8. Healthcare9. Education10. Federal infrastructure (power supply, roads, railways, airports, ports, waterways etc)11. Food supply (agriculture)12. Corruption including fraud/embezzlement13. Allegation of corruption against former politicians14. Judiciary15. How will you select your cabinetKeep in mind that you are a democratically elected President which means that you must act within the constitution. For example, you can’t just say you will throw former politicians alleged to be corrupt in jail without due process. You will have to charge them to court and seek a conviction against them from judges that may or may not be corrupt.I'm going to phrase the question differently to allow for more answers.Are you currently happy with Nigeria the way it is? If not, what are you not happy about and how will you change it?
    909 Posted by Luguterrah Millie
  • It is very easy to find fault in what someone else did or his doing; however, we find it difficult to profess a workable solution facing the same constraints. For one reason or another, some people feel jaded and/or disillusioned because GEJ has not lived up to their expectations, regardless of whether their expectations were reasonable or not.In the interest of full disclosure, I’m one of those people but I constantly ask myself if I can do any better facing the same constraints – some of the constraints which probably fostered me into power. I won’t answer the question so as not to set the tone of this post by seeming to be anti or pro GEJ.However, the question for you is:If you wake up tomorrow and find yourself to be the President of Nigeria, what would you do about the following and how would you do it? The “how” is the most important part of this exercise.1. Boko Haram, MEND, OPC etc (any armed group)2. Police and their inadequacies3. Manufacturing including import/export4. Youth unemployment5. Taxes6. Crude Oil revenue7. Mineral resources (mines)8. Healthcare9. Education10. Federal infrastructure (power supply, roads, railways, airports, ports, waterways etc)11. Food supply (agriculture)12. Corruption including fraud/embezzlement13. Allegation of corruption against former politicians14. Judiciary15. How will you select your cabinetKeep in mind that you are a democratically elected President which means that you must act within the constitution. For example, you can’t just say you will throw former politicians alleged to be corrupt in jail without due process. You will have to charge them to court and seek a conviction against them from judges that may or may not be corrupt.I'm going to phrase the question differently to allow for more answers.Are you currently happy with Nigeria the way it is? If not, what are you not happy about and how will you change it?
    Jan 30, 2013 909
  • 30 Jan 2013
    Let's have a lil' chat on one of the most consumed chemical on earth. Yes! It's alcohol. It comes in different forms but its effect remains the same. At first gulp of a green bottle it gives us EUPHORIA,then we go into EXCITEMENT as we empty the second bottle, then CONFUSION, STUPOR, COMA and with further intake the ultimate happens, DEATH! Those are the 6 stages of alcohol effect on our body.For its euphoric effect most of us love this chemical...especially on those evening hang outs...hmmm grin . Have you really thought about it's other effect when taken less than 4 hours before bedhuhRead on then...let's start with...* SNORINGEven if you're 'non-snorer', alcohol before bedtime can make you produce this nasty noise at night.How does it do it? Well,alcohol reduces the resting tone of the muscles at the back of your throat and relaxes your tongue,which can fall back to obstruct your airway during sleep. As you try to force air through these tissues they vibrate and so produce the snore.For snorers ,alcohol before bed worsens it.* OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEAThis is a disorder in which the upper airway narrows or closes during sleep. The resulting apnea (stoppage of breathing) awakens the person, who then resumes breathing and falls asleep again.Alcohol before bed can further relax the muscles of the airway and worsen the narrowing. Consequently,the person is deprived of peaceful sleep at night.* POOR S"EXUAL RESPONSELike i wrote earlier on,alcohol is both a nervous system depressant and a muscle relaxant.In men,alcohol before bed can lead to difficulty in getting and maintaining an e"rection. It's true that alcohol, in the euphoric or excitement stage, increases our s"exual urge but when it's time for real action,then the wahala comes!And in long term,it can cause full-blown e"rectile dysfunction.However, moderate intake,can help someone overcome poor e"rection or quick e"jaculation caused by anxiety. Though its not a good idea to build your s"ex life around alcohol...addiction and other side effect can result.For women,alcohol before bed can cause reduced lubrication,difficulty in achieving o"rgasm or o"rgasm that is less intense. And it's also much difficult to achieve pregnancy.* POT BELLE AND OVERWEIGHTAs we become less active towards the night, our metabolic rate also lessens. Thus major quantity of the alcohol consumed during this period will likely be converted to fats. These fats get deposited within and around your internal organs,other body parts and also within your abdominal wall. This leaves you with pot belle, overweight and increased risk of heart,liver,kidney and intestinal diseases!* SOAR THROAT AND INFECTIONSome people take alcohol to relief the pain of soar throat. unfortunately, this's temporal. And they're also ignorant of the fact the alcohol actualy causes and worsens soar throat.Alcohol irritates and dries the tissues of throat. It also decreases the function of the immune cells within the throat tissuses, therefore raises your risk of getting throat infection and other infections of the oral cavity.* NOCTURIA, NIGHT SWEAT, DEHYDRATION AND HANG OVERIt's normal to urinate 2 times or less in the night. One of the end product of alcohol metabolism is water,and with the diuretic effect of alcohol you will most likely urinate more often at night. Alcohol can also cause night sweat. All these can combine to cause dehydration.Don't forget...hang over will say ' good morning' the next day.* INSOMNIAIt may be suprising,but the truth is that alcohol before bed can cause insomnia.An average adult needs about 7.5-8 hours of sleep in a day to stay healthy. For some reasons, some people can't get this quantity of sleep in a day. So some, especially insomniacs, resort to taking alcohol to induce sleep and probably make it last longer. Initially, this might appear to work but it's diverstating in the long run.To undertand how alcohol cause insomnia let's learn some facts about sleep.Two main states and 6 stages characterise a normal sleep...# Non-rapid eye movement(NREM)sleepaka quiet sleep: stage 1-4# Rapid eye movement (REM) sleepaka active sleep: stage 5-6, most dreams occur at this stage.To have a good sleep you need to a balanced alternation between these two stages.Alcohol consumed 1-3 hours before bedtime interfers with sleep hormones and disrupts the sleep cycle (REM sleep seems more affected,it shortens it). The person is awaken by dream,the urge to urinate,sweat,breathlessness,dehydration etc but he finds it difficult returning to sleep. And the sedate effect of the alcohol must have faded by then.In addition,the person may develop tolerance to the sedative effect of the alcohol while the disruptive effect continues,hence insomnia continues!
    1480 Posted by Luguterrah Millie
  • Let's have a lil' chat on one of the most consumed chemical on earth. Yes! It's alcohol. It comes in different forms but its effect remains the same. At first gulp of a green bottle it gives us EUPHORIA,then we go into EXCITEMENT as we empty the second bottle, then CONFUSION, STUPOR, COMA and with further intake the ultimate happens, DEATH! Those are the 6 stages of alcohol effect on our body.For its euphoric effect most of us love this chemical...especially on those evening hang outs...hmmm grin . Have you really thought about it's other effect when taken less than 4 hours before bedhuhRead on then...let's start with...* SNORINGEven if you're 'non-snorer', alcohol before bedtime can make you produce this nasty noise at night.How does it do it? Well,alcohol reduces the resting tone of the muscles at the back of your throat and relaxes your tongue,which can fall back to obstruct your airway during sleep. As you try to force air through these tissues they vibrate and so produce the snore.For snorers ,alcohol before bed worsens it.* OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEAThis is a disorder in which the upper airway narrows or closes during sleep. The resulting apnea (stoppage of breathing) awakens the person, who then resumes breathing and falls asleep again.Alcohol before bed can further relax the muscles of the airway and worsen the narrowing. Consequently,the person is deprived of peaceful sleep at night.* POOR S"EXUAL RESPONSELike i wrote earlier on,alcohol is both a nervous system depressant and a muscle relaxant.In men,alcohol before bed can lead to difficulty in getting and maintaining an e"rection. It's true that alcohol, in the euphoric or excitement stage, increases our s"exual urge but when it's time for real action,then the wahala comes!And in long term,it can cause full-blown e"rectile dysfunction.However, moderate intake,can help someone overcome poor e"rection or quick e"jaculation caused by anxiety. Though its not a good idea to build your s"ex life around alcohol...addiction and other side effect can result.For women,alcohol before bed can cause reduced lubrication,difficulty in achieving o"rgasm or o"rgasm that is less intense. And it's also much difficult to achieve pregnancy.* POT BELLE AND OVERWEIGHTAs we become less active towards the night, our metabolic rate also lessens. Thus major quantity of the alcohol consumed during this period will likely be converted to fats. These fats get deposited within and around your internal organs,other body parts and also within your abdominal wall. This leaves you with pot belle, overweight and increased risk of heart,liver,kidney and intestinal diseases!* SOAR THROAT AND INFECTIONSome people take alcohol to relief the pain of soar throat. unfortunately, this's temporal. And they're also ignorant of the fact the alcohol actualy causes and worsens soar throat.Alcohol irritates and dries the tissues of throat. It also decreases the function of the immune cells within the throat tissuses, therefore raises your risk of getting throat infection and other infections of the oral cavity.* NOCTURIA, NIGHT SWEAT, DEHYDRATION AND HANG OVERIt's normal to urinate 2 times or less in the night. One of the end product of alcohol metabolism is water,and with the diuretic effect of alcohol you will most likely urinate more often at night. Alcohol can also cause night sweat. All these can combine to cause dehydration.Don't forget...hang over will say ' good morning' the next day.* INSOMNIAIt may be suprising,but the truth is that alcohol before bed can cause insomnia.An average adult needs about 7.5-8 hours of sleep in a day to stay healthy. For some reasons, some people can't get this quantity of sleep in a day. So some, especially insomniacs, resort to taking alcohol to induce sleep and probably make it last longer. Initially, this might appear to work but it's diverstating in the long run.To undertand how alcohol cause insomnia let's learn some facts about sleep.Two main states and 6 stages characterise a normal sleep...# Non-rapid eye movement(NREM)sleepaka quiet sleep: stage 1-4# Rapid eye movement (REM) sleepaka active sleep: stage 5-6, most dreams occur at this stage.To have a good sleep you need to a balanced alternation between these two stages.Alcohol consumed 1-3 hours before bedtime interfers with sleep hormones and disrupts the sleep cycle (REM sleep seems more affected,it shortens it). The person is awaken by dream,the urge to urinate,sweat,breathlessness,dehydration etc but he finds it difficult returning to sleep. And the sedate effect of the alcohol must have faded by then.In addition,the person may develop tolerance to the sedative effect of the alcohol while the disruptive effect continues,hence insomnia continues!
    Jan 30, 2013 1480
  • 30 Jan 2013
    A 27-year-old clerical officer of the Delta State University, DELSU, Abraka, one David Wonder Erhirhie has been sentenced to death by an Orerokpe high court in the State, having found him guilty of killing a female student, Princess Chinoso Ijezie who was seeking for admission at the University sometime in 2009.Prosecution led by Mr. Theophilous Omenuwoma had told the court that “David Wonder, until the ugly incident was a junior staff with DELSU was an admission racketeer who collected the sum of N155,000 from the deceased to assist her to secure admission into the University.“He however could not secure the admission for the deceased but in a bid to cover up the fraud he lured the late Princes Chinoso Ijezie to his house under the pretence that he wanted to refund the said amount but instead, he murdered and secretly buried her in a shallow grave close to his house before nemesis caught up with him”, prosecution added.Prosecution called six witnesses to prove its case while the accused testified by himself and called no witness.The court in convicting him stated that “the punishment for a crime of this magnitude is death penalty. This accused does not deserve less.He is therefore sentenced to death by the neck until he is dead”.
    472 Posted by Luguterrah Millie
  • A 27-year-old clerical officer of the Delta State University, DELSU, Abraka, one David Wonder Erhirhie has been sentenced to death by an Orerokpe high court in the State, having found him guilty of killing a female student, Princess Chinoso Ijezie who was seeking for admission at the University sometime in 2009.Prosecution led by Mr. Theophilous Omenuwoma had told the court that “David Wonder, until the ugly incident was a junior staff with DELSU was an admission racketeer who collected the sum of N155,000 from the deceased to assist her to secure admission into the University.“He however could not secure the admission for the deceased but in a bid to cover up the fraud he lured the late Princes Chinoso Ijezie to his house under the pretence that he wanted to refund the said amount but instead, he murdered and secretly buried her in a shallow grave close to his house before nemesis caught up with him”, prosecution added.Prosecution called six witnesses to prove its case while the accused testified by himself and called no witness.The court in convicting him stated that “the punishment for a crime of this magnitude is death penalty. This accused does not deserve less.He is therefore sentenced to death by the neck until he is dead”.
    Jan 30, 2013 472
  • 30 Jan 2013
    The subject of money-who has it, how they made and spend it is unarguably the most discussed. The few ones who have it are being villified for percieved bad ways of life but in all honesty, they secretly wish they become rich.I know there are reasons for wanting to be what we are now and what we want to be.For me, I love the good life. I want to be able to get what I want. I love the feeling that comes after being able to heal someone's financial handicap. I want to help the poor by creating jobs for them, donating to charities and helping a noble cause. I want to support missions in spreading the gospel of Jesus Christ. What would you do differently with money? Why do you want to be rich?
    14704 Posted by Luguterrah Millie
  • The subject of money-who has it, how they made and spend it is unarguably the most discussed. The few ones who have it are being villified for percieved bad ways of life but in all honesty, they secretly wish they become rich.I know there are reasons for wanting to be what we are now and what we want to be.For me, I love the good life. I want to be able to get what I want. I love the feeling that comes after being able to heal someone's financial handicap. I want to help the poor by creating jobs for them, donating to charities and helping a noble cause. I want to support missions in spreading the gospel of Jesus Christ. What would you do differently with money? Why do you want to be rich?
    Jan 30, 2013 14704
  • 30 Jan 2013
    China’s growing presence in Africa is one of the region’s biggest stories, but even seasoned analysts cannot decide whether this booming relationship is good or bad for Africa.Critics say Chinese strategy is entirely self-promotional, aimed at maintaining access to Africa’s precious mineral resources even when that means propping up odious governments. China’s supporters say the Asian superpower is strictly neutral and business-oriented, preferring to generate economic growth not a dangerous dependency on aid.China has certainly been contributing to Africa’s economic growth, both in terms of trade and with building infrastructure. All over the continent, it has built roads, railways, ports, airports, and more, filling a critical gap that western donors have been shy to provide and unblocking major bottlenecks to growth.The rehabilitated 840-mile Benguela railway line, for example, now connects Angola’s Atlantic coast with the Democratic Republic of Congo and Zambia. And Chinese-financed roads have cut journey times from Ethiopia’s hinterland to the strategic port of Djibouti, facilitating livestock exports.Meanwhile, bilateral trade between Africa and China continues to grow at an extraordinary pace, reaching $160 billion in 2011 from just $ 9 billion in 2000.But some 90 percent of Sino-African trade is still based around natural resources – oil, ores, and minerals. And exports of natural resources by themselves do not help Africa to develop as we can see from the examples of Nigeria and Angola, Sub-Saharan Africa’s two largest oil exporters.First, oil and mining are not labor intensive industries. So while natural resources may create impressive headline growth figures, they do not necessarily translate into widespread job creation.Second, as we saw in the Netherlands in the 1960s and Norway today, large oil and mineral reserves can distort the local currency, pushing up prices of other exports, such as agricultural products, and making them much harder to sell overseas.Third, without careful management, oil and mineral revenues have often fuelled corruption which has a severely negative impact on a country’s development. It’s notable, for example, that China is not yet one of the supporting countries for the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI), an initiative to promote transparency and accountability in the governance of natural resources.Away from the oil and mining industries, critics of China say they don’t see much evidence of China advocating for Africa on global issues either.Climate change and better access to overseas markets are two such issues. But at the Africa Progress Panel we see little evidence of China pushing hard for improved market access for African products in non-African markets. Indeed, South African and other manufacturers have frequently complained about the crushing competition from Chinese textiles. Nor do we see China pushing for any meaningful breakthroughs in climate negotiations that would favor African nations.More heavily publicized, Chinese use of its veto in the U.N. Security Council to inhibit international action on Darfur has made a mockery of China’s supposedly “neutral” stance.So what else could Africa and China do so that Africa benefits more from its growing relationship with China?For a start, African countries could diversify their economies as much as possible away from supplying unprocessed natural resources to China. This will make them less dependent on the vagaries of both the Chinese economy and the ups and downs of global commodity prices. Trade with China may have helped insulate Africa from the full impact of the 2008 financial crisis, but Africa still looks vulnerable to China’s economic slowdown. Meanwhile, African nations should also prepare for the day when they no longer have natural resources to sell. At the Africa Progress Panel, we talk about transforming natural resource wealth into human capital, by investing revenues into health and education.Second, African countries need to encourage Chinese investment into more labor intensive sectors. Africa’s population is growing faster than anywhere else in the world, and job creation is a top priority. If Africa cannot create jobs to keep up with the growth of its workforce, then we can expect to see a large and growing population of frustrated, jobless youth.As China’s relationship with Africa shifts from being essentially government-to-government to business-to-business, some analysts see enormous potential in the manufacturing industry, especially for clothing and textiles. Rising Chinese wages in this sector may lead Chinese manufacturers to export jobs to African countries where labor prices are lower.One example of how this might work is Zambia, where some 300 Chinese companies now employ around 25,000 people. Ethiopia’s shoemaking sector has also benefitted from Chinese investment that has created jobs and exports.For the most part, however, and despite the scale of investment, linkages between Chinese investment and local economies remains weak.Third, African countries could negotiate better terms with Chinese investors, including quality control and better linkages with local economies. African governments could urge China to improve market access for African goods overseas, for example in trade fora such as the World Trade Organization. The IMF estimates the average import tariff faced by low-income countries in Africa in the BRICS at 13 percent – around three times the level in the United States and the European Union (which also operate a range of non-tariff barriers).On quality, observers describe shoddy workmanship in a range of Chinese investments from crumbling walls in a Chinese-built hospital in Angola, enormous potholes in Ghanaian and Zambian roads, and a leaking roof in the African Union’s new $ 200 million headquarters opened in January.Fairly or unfairly, many in Africa complain that Chinese projects do not employ enough Africans or do enough to transfer skills and technology. The reality is that this will vary from project to project. When a country is emerging from a decade or two of civil war, its labor force may not have sufficient capacity to work on technical projects. But at the Africa Progress Panel we view job creation as a priority issue for Africa’s development. Skills development has a major role to play in this respect.And when Africans are employed, working conditions are sometimes substandard. Human Rights Watch reports dangerous work conditions in Zambian mines. And pay disputes at a copper mine also in Zambia led to two Chinese managers shooting at miners in 2010, then the death of a Chinese manager this August.Fifth, Africa could keep working to make itself as attractive a business environment as possible. At the Africa Progress Panel, we consider further regional economic integration to be a priority. Africa’s population will one day represent the world’s largest consumer market. If they can get increased market access by investing in a single country, Chinese businesses will want to invest much more.Analysts see more Chinese businesses coming to Africa, meaning that the Africa-China relationship is diversifying away from simply government-to-government relationships. This makes it harder to characterize the relationship as either good or bad. However we view it, China’s growing presence in Africa is part of a rapidly changing reality that presents enormous opportunity.
    216753 Posted by Luguterrah Millie
  • China’s growing presence in Africa is one of the region’s biggest stories, but even seasoned analysts cannot decide whether this booming relationship is good or bad for Africa.Critics say Chinese strategy is entirely self-promotional, aimed at maintaining access to Africa’s precious mineral resources even when that means propping up odious governments. China’s supporters say the Asian superpower is strictly neutral and business-oriented, preferring to generate economic growth not a dangerous dependency on aid.China has certainly been contributing to Africa’s economic growth, both in terms of trade and with building infrastructure. All over the continent, it has built roads, railways, ports, airports, and more, filling a critical gap that western donors have been shy to provide and unblocking major bottlenecks to growth.The rehabilitated 840-mile Benguela railway line, for example, now connects Angola’s Atlantic coast with the Democratic Republic of Congo and Zambia. And Chinese-financed roads have cut journey times from Ethiopia’s hinterland to the strategic port of Djibouti, facilitating livestock exports.Meanwhile, bilateral trade between Africa and China continues to grow at an extraordinary pace, reaching $160 billion in 2011 from just $ 9 billion in 2000.But some 90 percent of Sino-African trade is still based around natural resources – oil, ores, and minerals. And exports of natural resources by themselves do not help Africa to develop as we can see from the examples of Nigeria and Angola, Sub-Saharan Africa’s two largest oil exporters.First, oil and mining are not labor intensive industries. So while natural resources may create impressive headline growth figures, they do not necessarily translate into widespread job creation.Second, as we saw in the Netherlands in the 1960s and Norway today, large oil and mineral reserves can distort the local currency, pushing up prices of other exports, such as agricultural products, and making them much harder to sell overseas.Third, without careful management, oil and mineral revenues have often fuelled corruption which has a severely negative impact on a country’s development. It’s notable, for example, that China is not yet one of the supporting countries for the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI), an initiative to promote transparency and accountability in the governance of natural resources.Away from the oil and mining industries, critics of China say they don’t see much evidence of China advocating for Africa on global issues either.Climate change and better access to overseas markets are two such issues. But at the Africa Progress Panel we see little evidence of China pushing hard for improved market access for African products in non-African markets. Indeed, South African and other manufacturers have frequently complained about the crushing competition from Chinese textiles. Nor do we see China pushing for any meaningful breakthroughs in climate negotiations that would favor African nations.More heavily publicized, Chinese use of its veto in the U.N. Security Council to inhibit international action on Darfur has made a mockery of China’s supposedly “neutral” stance.So what else could Africa and China do so that Africa benefits more from its growing relationship with China?For a start, African countries could diversify their economies as much as possible away from supplying unprocessed natural resources to China. This will make them less dependent on the vagaries of both the Chinese economy and the ups and downs of global commodity prices. Trade with China may have helped insulate Africa from the full impact of the 2008 financial crisis, but Africa still looks vulnerable to China’s economic slowdown. Meanwhile, African nations should also prepare for the day when they no longer have natural resources to sell. At the Africa Progress Panel, we talk about transforming natural resource wealth into human capital, by investing revenues into health and education.Second, African countries need to encourage Chinese investment into more labor intensive sectors. Africa’s population is growing faster than anywhere else in the world, and job creation is a top priority. If Africa cannot create jobs to keep up with the growth of its workforce, then we can expect to see a large and growing population of frustrated, jobless youth.As China’s relationship with Africa shifts from being essentially government-to-government to business-to-business, some analysts see enormous potential in the manufacturing industry, especially for clothing and textiles. Rising Chinese wages in this sector may lead Chinese manufacturers to export jobs to African countries where labor prices are lower.One example of how this might work is Zambia, where some 300 Chinese companies now employ around 25,000 people. Ethiopia’s shoemaking sector has also benefitted from Chinese investment that has created jobs and exports.For the most part, however, and despite the scale of investment, linkages between Chinese investment and local economies remains weak.Third, African countries could negotiate better terms with Chinese investors, including quality control and better linkages with local economies. African governments could urge China to improve market access for African goods overseas, for example in trade fora such as the World Trade Organization. The IMF estimates the average import tariff faced by low-income countries in Africa in the BRICS at 13 percent – around three times the level in the United States and the European Union (which also operate a range of non-tariff barriers).On quality, observers describe shoddy workmanship in a range of Chinese investments from crumbling walls in a Chinese-built hospital in Angola, enormous potholes in Ghanaian and Zambian roads, and a leaking roof in the African Union’s new $ 200 million headquarters opened in January.Fairly or unfairly, many in Africa complain that Chinese projects do not employ enough Africans or do enough to transfer skills and technology. The reality is that this will vary from project to project. When a country is emerging from a decade or two of civil war, its labor force may not have sufficient capacity to work on technical projects. But at the Africa Progress Panel we view job creation as a priority issue for Africa’s development. Skills development has a major role to play in this respect.And when Africans are employed, working conditions are sometimes substandard. Human Rights Watch reports dangerous work conditions in Zambian mines. And pay disputes at a copper mine also in Zambia led to two Chinese managers shooting at miners in 2010, then the death of a Chinese manager this August.Fifth, Africa could keep working to make itself as attractive a business environment as possible. At the Africa Progress Panel, we consider further regional economic integration to be a priority. Africa’s population will one day represent the world’s largest consumer market. If they can get increased market access by investing in a single country, Chinese businesses will want to invest much more.Analysts see more Chinese businesses coming to Africa, meaning that the Africa-China relationship is diversifying away from simply government-to-government relationships. This makes it harder to characterize the relationship as either good or bad. However we view it, China’s growing presence in Africa is part of a rapidly changing reality that presents enormous opportunity.
    Jan 30, 2013 216753
  • 30 Jan 2013
     ‘I give God 10%, why should you get 18?’ Pastor to waiterI love this pastor, this mandatory tip can be a little annoying sha! lol. So a photo of the receipt above was posted on Reddit today. It shows a bill for $34.93 with an automatic tip of 18% ($6.29) included above a blank space for an additional tip.The customer who got bill wrote on it: 'I give God 10%, why do you get 18?', he then scratched out the automatic tip, wrote an emphatic 'O' in the additional tip and signed it Pastor.Lol. No time, no time!
    41113 Posted by Luguterrah Millie
  •  ‘I give God 10%, why should you get 18?’ Pastor to waiterI love this pastor, this mandatory tip can be a little annoying sha! lol. So a photo of the receipt above was posted on Reddit today. It shows a bill for $34.93 with an automatic tip of 18% ($6.29) included above a blank space for an additional tip.The customer who got bill wrote on it: 'I give God 10%, why do you get 18?', he then scratched out the automatic tip, wrote an emphatic 'O' in the additional tip and signed it Pastor.Lol. No time, no time!
    Jan 30, 2013 41113
  • 30 Jan 2013
    The subject of money-who has it, how they made and spend it is unarguably the most discussed. The few ones who have it are being villified for percieved bad ways of life but in all honesty, they secretly wish they become rich.I know there are reasons for wanting to be what we are now and what we want to be.For me, I love the good life. I want to be able to get what I want. I love the feeling that comes after being able to heal someone's financial handicap. I want to help the poor by creating jobs for them, donating to charities and helping a noble cause. I want to support missions in spreading the gospel of Jesus Christ. What would you do differently with money? Why do you want to be rich?
    14704 Posted by Luguterrah Millie
  • The subject of money-who has it, how they made and spend it is unarguably the most discussed. The few ones who have it are being villified for percieved bad ways of life but in all honesty, they secretly wish they become rich.I know there are reasons for wanting to be what we are now and what we want to be.For me, I love the good life. I want to be able to get what I want. I love the feeling that comes after being able to heal someone's financial handicap. I want to help the poor by creating jobs for them, donating to charities and helping a noble cause. I want to support missions in spreading the gospel of Jesus Christ. What would you do differently with money? Why do you want to be rich?
    Jan 30, 2013 14704
  • 03 Feb 2013
    Shocking moment Black teenager punches woman after she calls him a 'smelly Nigerian'..
    6392 Posted by webby
  • By webby
    Shocking moment Black teenager punches woman after she calls him a 'smelly Nigerian'..
    Feb 03, 2013 6392
  • 30 Jan 2013
    Let's have a lil' chat on one of the most consumed chemical on earth. Yes! It's alcohol. It comes in different forms but its effect remains the same. At first gulp of a green bottle it gives us EUPHORIA,then we go into EXCITEMENT as we empty the second bottle, then CONFUSION, STUPOR, COMA and with further intake the ultimate happens, DEATH! Those are the 6 stages of alcohol effect on our body.For its euphoric effect most of us love this chemical...especially on those evening hang outs...hmmm grin . Have you really thought about it's other effect when taken less than 4 hours before bedhuhRead on then...let's start with...* SNORINGEven if you're 'non-snorer', alcohol before bedtime can make you produce this nasty noise at night.How does it do it? Well,alcohol reduces the resting tone of the muscles at the back of your throat and relaxes your tongue,which can fall back to obstruct your airway during sleep. As you try to force air through these tissues they vibrate and so produce the snore.For snorers ,alcohol before bed worsens it.* OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEAThis is a disorder in which the upper airway narrows or closes during sleep. The resulting apnea (stoppage of breathing) awakens the person, who then resumes breathing and falls asleep again.Alcohol before bed can further relax the muscles of the airway and worsen the narrowing. Consequently,the person is deprived of peaceful sleep at night.* POOR S"EXUAL RESPONSELike i wrote earlier on,alcohol is both a nervous system depressant and a muscle relaxant.In men,alcohol before bed can lead to difficulty in getting and maintaining an e"rection. It's true that alcohol, in the euphoric or excitement stage, increases our s"exual urge but when it's time for real action,then the wahala comes!And in long term,it can cause full-blown e"rectile dysfunction.However, moderate intake,can help someone overcome poor e"rection or quick e"jaculation caused by anxiety. Though its not a good idea to build your s"ex life around alcohol...addiction and other side effect can result.For women,alcohol before bed can cause reduced lubrication,difficulty in achieving o"rgasm or o"rgasm that is less intense. And it's also much difficult to achieve pregnancy.* POT BELLE AND OVERWEIGHTAs we become less active towards the night, our metabolic rate also lessens. Thus major quantity of the alcohol consumed during this period will likely be converted to fats. These fats get deposited within and around your internal organs,other body parts and also within your abdominal wall. This leaves you with pot belle, overweight and increased risk of heart,liver,kidney and intestinal diseases!* SOAR THROAT AND INFECTIONSome people take alcohol to relief the pain of soar throat. unfortunately, this's temporal. And they're also ignorant of the fact the alcohol actualy causes and worsens soar throat.Alcohol irritates and dries the tissues of throat. It also decreases the function of the immune cells within the throat tissuses, therefore raises your risk of getting throat infection and other infections of the oral cavity.* NOCTURIA, NIGHT SWEAT, DEHYDRATION AND HANG OVERIt's normal to urinate 2 times or less in the night. One of the end product of alcohol metabolism is water,and with the diuretic effect of alcohol you will most likely urinate more often at night. Alcohol can also cause night sweat. All these can combine to cause dehydration.Don't forget...hang over will say ' good morning' the next day.* INSOMNIAIt may be suprising,but the truth is that alcohol before bed can cause insomnia.An average adult needs about 7.5-8 hours of sleep in a day to stay healthy. For some reasons, some people can't get this quantity of sleep in a day. So some, especially insomniacs, resort to taking alcohol to induce sleep and probably make it last longer. Initially, this might appear to work but it's diverstating in the long run.To undertand how alcohol cause insomnia let's learn some facts about sleep.Two main states and 6 stages characterise a normal sleep...# Non-rapid eye movement(NREM)sleepaka quiet sleep: stage 1-4# Rapid eye movement (REM) sleepaka active sleep: stage 5-6, most dreams occur at this stage.To have a good sleep you need to a balanced alternation between these two stages.Alcohol consumed 1-3 hours before bedtime interfers with sleep hormones and disrupts the sleep cycle (REM sleep seems more affected,it shortens it). The person is awaken by dream,the urge to urinate,sweat,breathlessness,dehydration etc but he finds it difficult returning to sleep. And the sedate effect of the alcohol must have faded by then.In addition,the person may develop tolerance to the sedative effect of the alcohol while the disruptive effect continues,hence insomnia continues!
    1480 Posted by Luguterrah Millie
  • Let's have a lil' chat on one of the most consumed chemical on earth. Yes! It's alcohol. It comes in different forms but its effect remains the same. At first gulp of a green bottle it gives us EUPHORIA,then we go into EXCITEMENT as we empty the second bottle, then CONFUSION, STUPOR, COMA and with further intake the ultimate happens, DEATH! Those are the 6 stages of alcohol effect on our body.For its euphoric effect most of us love this chemical...especially on those evening hang outs...hmmm grin . Have you really thought about it's other effect when taken less than 4 hours before bedhuhRead on then...let's start with...* SNORINGEven if you're 'non-snorer', alcohol before bedtime can make you produce this nasty noise at night.How does it do it? Well,alcohol reduces the resting tone of the muscles at the back of your throat and relaxes your tongue,which can fall back to obstruct your airway during sleep. As you try to force air through these tissues they vibrate and so produce the snore.For snorers ,alcohol before bed worsens it.* OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEAThis is a disorder in which the upper airway narrows or closes during sleep. The resulting apnea (stoppage of breathing) awakens the person, who then resumes breathing and falls asleep again.Alcohol before bed can further relax the muscles of the airway and worsen the narrowing. Consequently,the person is deprived of peaceful sleep at night.* POOR S"EXUAL RESPONSELike i wrote earlier on,alcohol is both a nervous system depressant and a muscle relaxant.In men,alcohol before bed can lead to difficulty in getting and maintaining an e"rection. It's true that alcohol, in the euphoric or excitement stage, increases our s"exual urge but when it's time for real action,then the wahala comes!And in long term,it can cause full-blown e"rectile dysfunction.However, moderate intake,can help someone overcome poor e"rection or quick e"jaculation caused by anxiety. Though its not a good idea to build your s"ex life around alcohol...addiction and other side effect can result.For women,alcohol before bed can cause reduced lubrication,difficulty in achieving o"rgasm or o"rgasm that is less intense. And it's also much difficult to achieve pregnancy.* POT BELLE AND OVERWEIGHTAs we become less active towards the night, our metabolic rate also lessens. Thus major quantity of the alcohol consumed during this period will likely be converted to fats. These fats get deposited within and around your internal organs,other body parts and also within your abdominal wall. This leaves you with pot belle, overweight and increased risk of heart,liver,kidney and intestinal diseases!* SOAR THROAT AND INFECTIONSome people take alcohol to relief the pain of soar throat. unfortunately, this's temporal. And they're also ignorant of the fact the alcohol actualy causes and worsens soar throat.Alcohol irritates and dries the tissues of throat. It also decreases the function of the immune cells within the throat tissuses, therefore raises your risk of getting throat infection and other infections of the oral cavity.* NOCTURIA, NIGHT SWEAT, DEHYDRATION AND HANG OVERIt's normal to urinate 2 times or less in the night. One of the end product of alcohol metabolism is water,and with the diuretic effect of alcohol you will most likely urinate more often at night. Alcohol can also cause night sweat. All these can combine to cause dehydration.Don't forget...hang over will say ' good morning' the next day.* INSOMNIAIt may be suprising,but the truth is that alcohol before bed can cause insomnia.An average adult needs about 7.5-8 hours of sleep in a day to stay healthy. For some reasons, some people can't get this quantity of sleep in a day. So some, especially insomniacs, resort to taking alcohol to induce sleep and probably make it last longer. Initially, this might appear to work but it's diverstating in the long run.To undertand how alcohol cause insomnia let's learn some facts about sleep.Two main states and 6 stages characterise a normal sleep...# Non-rapid eye movement(NREM)sleepaka quiet sleep: stage 1-4# Rapid eye movement (REM) sleepaka active sleep: stage 5-6, most dreams occur at this stage.To have a good sleep you need to a balanced alternation between these two stages.Alcohol consumed 1-3 hours before bedtime interfers with sleep hormones and disrupts the sleep cycle (REM sleep seems more affected,it shortens it). The person is awaken by dream,the urge to urinate,sweat,breathlessness,dehydration etc but he finds it difficult returning to sleep. And the sedate effect of the alcohol must have faded by then.In addition,the person may develop tolerance to the sedative effect of the alcohol while the disruptive effect continues,hence insomnia continues!
    Jan 30, 2013 1480
  • 30 Jan 2013
    It is very easy to find fault in what someone else did or his doing; however, we find it difficult to profess a workable solution facing the same constraints. For one reason or another, some people feel jaded and/or disillusioned because GEJ has not lived up to their expectations, regardless of whether their expectations were reasonable or not.In the interest of full disclosure, I’m one of those people but I constantly ask myself if I can do any better facing the same constraints – some of the constraints which probably fostered me into power. I won’t answer the question so as not to set the tone of this post by seeming to be anti or pro GEJ.However, the question for you is:If you wake up tomorrow and find yourself to be the President of Nigeria, what would you do about the following and how would you do it? The “how” is the most important part of this exercise.1. Boko Haram, MEND, OPC etc (any armed group)2. Police and their inadequacies3. Manufacturing including import/export4. Youth unemployment5. Taxes6. Crude Oil revenue7. Mineral resources (mines)8. Healthcare9. Education10. Federal infrastructure (power supply, roads, railways, airports, ports, waterways etc)11. Food supply (agriculture)12. Corruption including fraud/embezzlement13. Allegation of corruption against former politicians14. Judiciary15. How will you select your cabinetKeep in mind that you are a democratically elected President which means that you must act within the constitution. For example, you can’t just say you will throw former politicians alleged to be corrupt in jail without due process. You will have to charge them to court and seek a conviction against them from judges that may or may not be corrupt.I'm going to phrase the question differently to allow for more answers.Are you currently happy with Nigeria the way it is? If not, what are you not happy about and how will you change it?
    909 Posted by Luguterrah Millie
  • It is very easy to find fault in what someone else did or his doing; however, we find it difficult to profess a workable solution facing the same constraints. For one reason or another, some people feel jaded and/or disillusioned because GEJ has not lived up to their expectations, regardless of whether their expectations were reasonable or not.In the interest of full disclosure, I’m one of those people but I constantly ask myself if I can do any better facing the same constraints – some of the constraints which probably fostered me into power. I won’t answer the question so as not to set the tone of this post by seeming to be anti or pro GEJ.However, the question for you is:If you wake up tomorrow and find yourself to be the President of Nigeria, what would you do about the following and how would you do it? The “how” is the most important part of this exercise.1. Boko Haram, MEND, OPC etc (any armed group)2. Police and their inadequacies3. Manufacturing including import/export4. Youth unemployment5. Taxes6. Crude Oil revenue7. Mineral resources (mines)8. Healthcare9. Education10. Federal infrastructure (power supply, roads, railways, airports, ports, waterways etc)11. Food supply (agriculture)12. Corruption including fraud/embezzlement13. Allegation of corruption against former politicians14. Judiciary15. How will you select your cabinetKeep in mind that you are a democratically elected President which means that you must act within the constitution. For example, you can’t just say you will throw former politicians alleged to be corrupt in jail without due process. You will have to charge them to court and seek a conviction against them from judges that may or may not be corrupt.I'm going to phrase the question differently to allow for more answers.Are you currently happy with Nigeria the way it is? If not, what are you not happy about and how will you change it?
    Jan 30, 2013 909